Keeping the Flame Alive: Ways to Keep Your Podcasts Fresh

By Courtney Echerd

When you become a seasoned podcaster, especially if you have hit the level of success you initially aimed for, it can be hard not to go through the motions. You set up, you record, you edit, you edit some more, and then you post. The cycle begins all over again. And that’s it. But that doesn’t have to be it! You started this podcast for a reason. With just a few of these simple tricks, you’ll be able to keep the magic alive and get out of your podcasting rut.

Let someone else host.
I know, I know. Letting someone else host your podcast can sound as scary as leaving your baby with your mailman for a week. You might be thinking, “No! Hosting is my favorite part!”, “What if they screw it up?”, or “What will my listeners think?”, and to that I’ve got to say that it’s worth the risk. Having a friend or expert on your podcast topic host your show brings in a fresh perspective, and with that, fresh ideas.

Sneaky Benefit: You kind of, almost, a little bit, get the week off.

Don’t Forget: Having someone else host does not mean you’re having someone else DO your podcast. While your guest host may have some background in recording or editing, it’s still your show, so make sure to be present when they’re recording.

 

Ask your listeners what THEY want to hear.
If you have a loyal following, your fans have things they are hoping you will talk about, I promise. Ask them what those topics are! You can do this by opening up a comment thread, ending your podcast asking your listeners to send ideas to an email address, or creating a feedback board. This will also help your listeners to feel valued and heard.

Sneaky Benefit: The time you’d usually spend brainstorming is cut right in half. You don’t have to worry about coming up with new content, you’ll just have to figure out which ideas are actually practical for your podcast.

Don’t Forget: Some listeners might be a little frustrated or insulted if you choose another listener’s idea. Make sure to be respectful of your loyal listeners and mention that you’re grateful for all submissions.

 

Get a change of scenery.
Just for one podcast, get out of your normal studio setting. Head to a park, a convention, a mall, anywhere that’s relevant to that podcast’s topic. It can be a little awkward to talk into a microphone in public, but you will get an abundance of awesome nat-pops for your story. Plus, getting out of the comfort of your normal recording space will make you that much more comfortable when you return to it.

Sneaky Benefit: It’s FUN! Your office, studio, or bedroom can get a little stuffy. You get a little podcast-adventure out of it.

Don’t Forget: While the nat-pops will add an element to your podcast, they can make editing for consistency a little difficult. Make sure to bring a windscreen and check your audio levels before recording. It also can’t hurt to do a couple of takes before leaving the recording locations.

 

Do a collab.
Collaborating, or “doing a collab”, on a podcast is fun and spices up the flow of your podcast. Find a few podcasters from your same topic or a new subject you want to explore and start sending some emails about collaborating. The other podcaster doesn’t even have to be in your area. You can utilize apps that record phone calls for the entire audio portion.

Sneaky Benefit: You get to observe how another podcaster operates and implement those tactics into your own podcasts. And hey, you just might make a new friend.

Don’t forget: You’re collaborating, so that means the other podcaster gets to share the podcast on their page, too. It’s free advertising for both of you.

 

Get out of your comfort zone.
This is perhaps the most important tip and there’s no exact way to do it. Use your podcast as an excuse to challenge yourself and be creative. You’ll thank yourself later.

 

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